Use a primary journal article (not older than 6 months) and create an infographi
Use a primary journal article (not older than 6 months) and create an infographi
Use a primary journal article (not older than 6 months) and create an infographic. Choose any topic you desire. Decide on the type of infographic that you will create (informational, data/statistical, process, geographical, or mixed) and what your motivation (or purpose) is for communicating creating and designing infographic: https://www.clips.edu.au/infographics/ Choose an appropriate program to create the infographics. You can use general programs like Microsoft PowerPoint, or you can use infographic software packages like Canva, Piktochart, Easel.ly, Infogr.am or Venngage Infographic titles should: Be very brief. Effective infographic titles are generally between 1-5 words. An infographic title should not exceed 10 words. Be clear and concise. Once you have written your infographic title try to write it several times to see if you can get it as concise as possible, without losing any meaning. Be specific and complement the content of your infographic. It should be obvious from glancing at the infographic title what the infographic will cover. Catch, and hold the reader's attention. While we are not aiming to sensationalise science in our infographics, we are aiming for a title to catch their attention. Conforming to the above points (i.e. short, clear and concise) is step one. Using language that a general audience can understand and connect to is also important. Avoid click bait titles, because we are still communicating science. Be posed as a question or statement. Your titles can be posed as either a statement or a question. Be written in an informal language. Your titles should be written in an informal language. In infographics titles this means that you may omit articles (i.e. "the" and "a"). Avoid value judgements where possible. While we want to engage the reader with our titles, we don't want them forming a value-based judgement that something is "bad" or "good" based on our title alone. With topics like climate change and food security this may not be possible to entire remove value laden terminology from your title. The use of effective language in infographics Use an easy to read font, appropriate spacing. You have more variability when it comes to text size and font in Infographics, and you may use a variety of fonts or font sizes depending on your design. Use informal language. In informal language it is okay to: Use a conversational writing style. Can start sentences with conjunctions (i.e. And, But, So, etc.) Can use contractions (i.e. Won't, Can't, Hasn't, etc) Can use colloquialisms or slang. Use strong, precise and concise wording. Avoid jargon. Science is rife with jargon. When you are writing for other scientists, a level of jargon is acceptable. When writing for a general audience you must assume that they have little to no knowledge of your topic. Complex ideas. Explain overly complex ideas. Even very complex scientific processes or ideas can be broken down into bite sized pieces that can be understood by a reader. Providing an example in these situations can also help explain a complex idea. Tone. Aim for a conversational tone that mimics the way people speak. For example, instead of “A male person disembarked from the vehicle”, they would say “a man stepped out of the car”? Spelling conventions. Follow either US (i.e. color, visualize) or UK (i.e. colour, visualise) spelling conventions, but don't switch between the two. Sentence structures and lengths. In your infographics, text is kept to a minimum. Often infographics use declarative, simple and short sentences. Declarative sentences are quite common in the english language, but if you want to brush up on what a declarative sentence is watch the following video. The use of text in infographics When preparing the text for your infographics: Keep text to a minimum. In infographics the text accompanies the graphics, not the other way around. Text should support the message, not contain it. This ties in with the above dot-point. Include an overarching title. Titles should be direct, clear, compelling. They should also be short, and stand out from the rest of the text (i.e. larger, bold, a different colour or all three). Include a brief ‘problem statement’ (if applicable). This adds context at the front end of your infographic. Include sub-headings (depends on the type of infographic). Sub-headings can act as short descriptive signposts. These should also be formatted so that you can differentiate these from the rest of the text (i.e. slightly larger, bold, a different colour or all three). Very large data points can be presented using text. If this makes the message clearer that is fine, but large blocks of text should be avoided as much as possible. Using data visualisations Data visualisations can be graphs, like pie charts or bar graphs, or a less common type like a pictogram chart. The three most important principles of using data visualisations are: Accuracy, Consistency, and Clarity. Accurate data visualisations use the right type of visualisation, and present the data correctly, or without distortion. Consistent data visualisations use the same formatting, scale, and style across the whole infographic. This is another way of ensuring accuracy, as graphs with different scales or formatting can distort the data. Clear data visualisation means streamlining your design to only show the necessary information. You want to highlight the trend or message in your data, not show everything you know. You can do this by labelling data points directly with the value or name, including a short summary of the trends instead of a figure legend, and using design principles like contrast to highlight main points. For your infographic you will be acknowledging text sources via a reference (in the reference list) at the end of the infographic. You will acknowledge graphic sources (including icons) via your reference list. You do not need to add in-text citations, in-text hyperlinks or copyrights throughout the infographic, only a reference list that has all sources used. (Have provided attached document on how the reference list should look like) Also attached are examples of infographics.

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