There has been recent debate about immigration reform in the U.S. and whether na
There has been recent debate about immigration reform in the U.S. and whether na
There has been recent debate about immigration reform in the U.S. and whether national legislation needs to be addressed about health care for immigrants. Immigration law is very complex, and there are many steps on the road to U.S. citizenship. Legal distinctions are made among different types of immigrants, including naturalized citizens, noncitizens, and undocumented immigrants. Evidence shows that noncitizens and undocumented immigrants are more likely to lack health insurance than citizens. Only about 40% of noncitizens have private coverage. This leaves the other 60% of noncitizen immigrants without options for health care coverage (except emergency care) and may preclude regular access to physicians and other health professionals. In addition, noncitizens and undocumented immigrants tend to have poorer access and receive less care than citizens, even when they have health insurance. The aim of this paper is to redefine citizenship for immigrants to avoid unjust political exclusions from political agency. By redefining the limits of citizenship, we can understand healthcare is not a political right but a basic human right. Rather, healthcare is not exclusive only to citizenship. Thus, Healthcare is an inalienable right to which all humans, regardless of citizenship are entitled in principal.

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