Researching The Influence of Romaine Brooks in the Lesbian Art Scene in 20th Cen
Researching The Influence of Romaine Brooks in the Lesbian Art Scene in 20th Cen
Researching The Influence of Romaine Brooks in the Lesbian Art Scene in 20th Century Paris Written Research Paper The paper must include the following components. If any of these items are omitted, you risk receiving an F for your paper grade. Around five pages of actual text (around 1,250-1,500 words), not including notes. Notes (either footnotes or endnotes—follow the University of Chicago style—info available at http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html and in the Research Handbook. Bibliography—this should not just be a re-iteration of the sources in your notes; it is a list of all the sources you looked at that you found to be relevant to your topic, even if you actually did not use them directly in your paper. It should include a range of books, articles, and (reliable) websites, with the emphasis on the first two. Depending on your topic and the availability of materials, I would expect anywhere from 10 good sources upwards to 20 or 30. Illustrations (these may be integrated into the text, or placed separately at the end). Identify works in a caption by artist, title, and date, and label them “Figure 1,” “Figure 2,” etc., and refer to them as such in your text. See your textbooks for examples. The key to a successful project: choose your topic carefully. It needs to be very narrow, as the length of your essay is very limited. I recommend investigating a single work of art as a good way to limit your subject. Your essay will be much easier to write if you have an axe to grind. Develop a hypothesis and then argue it. Constructing your paper as an argument will help you to focus and to organize your writing effectively. Write as clearly and cleanly as possible. Watch out for the following: Italicize the titles of works of art. Do not put them in quotation marks unless you find them listed that way (in which case they will also be italicized). Space twice after the punctuation at the ends of sentences. This is a basic typing skill that makes what you write more legible. Double space your writing. Write in complete sentences. Make sure there is a subject and a verb. Don’t make a clause into a sentence—watch out for sentences starting with conjunctions such as “because,” “while,” “since,” “that,” “which,” etc. If they start out this way, they’ll need to end with a comma and be followed by the main sentence. Do not get these mixed up: it’s = it is; its = the possessive of it. Do not insert apostrophes randomly. If you don’t know punctuation rules, get out a book and learn them. Do not rely solely on spell check. If you’ve actually used the wrong word, and not misspelled it, it won’t detect it. You must proof, repeatedly. The adjective form of an artistic movement ends in “-ist.” Thus, “the Impressionist painter,” not “the Impressionism painter” or “the Impressionistic painter.” “Simple” and “Simplistic” mean entirely different things. Keep a dictionary at hand to double-check meanings. Don’t try to use fancy-sounding words when simple ones will do. Proofread your writing by reading it out loud, slowly. You will often detect confusing and error-filled writing by hearing it rather than reading it. Papers will be assigned a numeric grade based on: Following instructions correctly Clean, clear, effective organization and writing (includes avoiding typos and mechanical errors) Thoroughness of research Originality of thought

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