In weeks 1.2 and 1.3, we read selections from the New Testament, including excer
In weeks 1.2 and 1.3, we read selections from the New Testament, including excer
In weeks 1.2 and 1.3, we read selections from the New Testament, including excerpts from the Gospels, the Acts of Apostles and Paul’s Epistles. In the Study Guides for Weeks 1.2 Download 1.2and 1.3 Download 1.3, I highlighted the different approaches of the evangelists (the writers of the Gospels) to Jesus’s relationship with Jewish tradition and law, the Hebrew Bible (what would become the Christian “Old Testament”), and prominent Jewish groups like the scribes, Pharisees, and priests. In some forums (like those on Acts and on Paul), topics looked at how these New Testament writings—by early followers of Jesus—presented Jesus’s mission in the light of Old Testament prophecies. In Acts, the deacon Stephen turned the accusations of the Jewish authorities against them, by retelling stories from the Hebrew Bible, including the story of Moses, and arguing that the rejection of Jesus and his arrest and trial by the Jewish authorities was part of a tradition of faithlessness and rejecting prophets. Paul argued that Gentiles (non-Jews) who became followers of Jesus did not have to embrace Jewish law or practices like circumcision, and he “allegorized” (=interpreted symbolically) stories like that of Abraham’s two sons or of Jacob and Esau as foreshadowing the way in which, in Paul's view, Jesus’ new covenant and his followers' faith in Jesus would supersede the demands of Jewish law and expand God’s covenant with the Israelites to all believers. Over the next several centuries, Christian writers, including the theologians known today as the “Church Fathers” (e.g., Ambrose, Augustine...), developed rich allegories to interpret the stories and prophecies of the Hebrew Bible as symbols or figures looking ahead to the life of Jesus, the community or church of his followers, and his Second Coming. These Christian interpretations of the Hebrew Bible spilled over into the visual arts: we’ve seen the selective use of stories, most famously that of Jonah, in the Christian catacombs and on Christian sarcophagi. They would appear in manuscript paintings and mosaics in churches. Such imagery also incorporated apocryphal tales from Jewish traditions which were not part of the Bible, but which enriched the stories of the early patriarchs. In the seventh century, the Qur’an would also take over and appropriate this heritage, using Abraham, for example, as a figure of obedience to God, rigorous monotheism, and the unity of all believers, in age before the law of Moses and before the split between Jews and Christians. The story of Moses is also told—from different perspectives—in several Suras (=chapters) of the Qur’an, and many other figures from the Hebrew Bible make their appearance. You should choose a specific figure or episode from the Hebrew Bible that was given new meanings by early Christians and/or Muslims. You may refer to Christian texts or the visual arts, or to the Qur’an. Must be atleast two paragraps long. In choosing a topic, my advice is twofold: 1) Be specific: “Christian views of Abraham” is too broad; but comparing two or three early Christian authors’ views of the sacrifice of Isaac or Cain’s jealousy would be appropriate. Or you might compare an early Christian/early medieval image of one of these stories with an early Christian text. Similarly, “Moses in the Qur’an” is too broad, but you might look at two or three of the accounts of Moses’ confrontation with Pharaoh in the Qur’an or Moses’ birth and early calling by God. 2) Look for significance: I want you to choose something you find interesting, but you should also be able to demonstrate (the “So what? question) how a specific topic (even a very specific one!) is relevant because it is an example of bigger themes and trends in how and why early Christians made the Hebrew Bible their own, or how and why the Qur’an reinterpreted those biblical traditions. ** I will attatch where this discussion post left off in a word doc. Now you would have to elaborate and continue the discussion post and explain in two different sections. Both will be continous one after the other from the original entry/attachment. Each section should be at least 3 paragraps in length totalling in 6 paragraphs. https://oxford-universitypressscholarship-com.ezproxy.lib.usf.edu/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780190231491.001.0001/acprof-9780190231491

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