For this discussion, you will respond to two prompts, one about African American
For this discussion, you will respond to two prompts, one about African American
For this discussion, you will respond to two prompts, one about African American women who fought against racism, and one about African American men who did the same. Respond to Part One and Part Two By May 6. (worth up to 20 pts) Respond to two other students' posts by May 8. (worth 5 pts.) Make sure your posts are detailed, and reveal your close engagement with the writings and words of these powerful Civil Rights leaders! PART ONE: Read the pdf on the influence of African American women during the Civil Rights Movement linked below. After reading this, choose one of the women highlighted in this reading and find a speech she gave on civil rights, and share with the class. You can share the words of the speech, or better yet, you can share a YouTube clip in you find one. Provide a two-paragraph analysis of her speech. What is the argument made? Is gender used in this speech? If so, in what way? What does this woman add to the conversation about the Civil Rights? PART TWO: After reading the three quotes from famous African American men who who preached against racism, respond to the following question in at least one full paragraph: Many people have debated whether it is morally justifiable to use violence in the fight against racism and for Civil Rights. What do each of the quotes reveal about what Frederick Douglass, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Malcolm X felt about the use of violence in the struggle for civil rights? How does each man make his point? What justifications do they give to support their position? “If speech alone could have abolished slavery, the work would have been done long ago. What we want is an anti-slavery government, in harmony with our anti-slavery speech, one which will give effect to our words, and translate them into acts. For this, the ballot is needed, and if this will not be heard and heeded, then the bullet. We have had enough, and are sick of it. When anti-slavery laws are wanted, anti-slavery men should vote for them; and when a slave is to be snatched from the hand of a kidnapper, physical force is needed, and he who gives it proves himself a more useful anti-slavery man than he who refuses to give it, and contents himself by talking of a 'sword of the spirit.'” -- Frederick Douglass, “The Ballot and the Bullet,” 1859 I have tried to stand between these two forces, saying that we need emulate neither the "do nothingism" of the complacent nor the hatred and despair of the black nationalist. For there is the more excellent way of love and nonviolent protest. I am grateful to God that, through the influence of the Negro church, the way of nonviolence became an integral part of our struggle. If this philosophy had not emerged, by now many streets of the South would, I am convinced, be flowing with blood. And I am further convinced that if our white brothers dismiss as "rabble rousers" and "outside agitators" those of us who employ nonviolent direct action, and if they refuse to support our nonviolent efforts, millions of Negroes will, out of frustration and despair, seek solace and security in black nationalist ideologies--a development that would inevitably lead to a frightening racial nightmare. -- Martin Luther King, Jr., Letter from a Birmingham Jail, 1963 "The black nationalists aren’t going to wait. Lyndon B. Johnson is the head of the Democratic Party. If he’s for civil rights, let him go into the Senate next week and declare himself. Let him go in there right now and declare himself. Let him go in there and denounce the Southern branch of his party. Let him go in there right now and take a moral stand—right now, not later. Tell him don’t wait until election time. If he waits too long, brothers and sisters, he will be responsible for letting a condition develop in this country which will create a climate that will bring seeds up out of the ground with vegetation on the end of them looking like something these people never dreamed of. In 1964, it’s the ballot or the bullet." -- Malcolm X, “The Ballot and the Bullet,” 1964

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