Compare & Contrast
Compare & Contrast
I. Introduction (Lead in statement - grab the reader's attention about the subject)

A. Supporting Information (introduce the work and author of the short story)

B. Supporting Information (give a brief summary of the short story; do not write sentences in paragraph form.)

C. Thesis (should be last sentence and should address the topic)

II. First Point of Comparison Body (Topic Sentence)

 A. Supporting Sentence (sentence should develop topic sentence; may be an example, description, explanation, etc.)

B.  Supporting Sentence (sentence should develop topic sentence; may be an example, description, explanation, etc.)

C. Supporting Sentence (sentence should develop topic sentence; may be an example, description, explanation, etc.)

D. Clincher Sentence (sentence that brings the discussion to a close and may serve as a transition into the next paragraph)

III. Second Point of Comparison Body (Topic Sentence)

 A. Supporting Sentence (sentence should develop topic sentence; may an be example, description, explanation, etc.)

B.  Supporting Sentence (sentence should develop topic sentence; may be an example, description, explanation, etc.)

C. Supporting Sentence (sentence should develop topic sentence; may be an example, description, explanation, etc.)

D. Clincher Sentence (sentence that brings the discussion to a close and may serve as a transition into the next paragraph)

IV. Third Point of Comparison Body (Topic Sentence)

 A. Supporting Sentence (sentence should develop topic sentence; may be an example, description, explanation, etc.)

B.  Supporting Sentence (sentence should develop topic sentence; may be an example, description, explanation, etc.)

C. Supporting Sentence (sentence should develop topic sentence; may be an example, description, explanation, etc.)

D. Clincher Sentence (sentence that brings the discussion to a close and may serve as a transition into the next paragraph)

V. Conclusion (Restate thesis statement; should not be worded the same but maintain the same idea)

A. Supporting Sentence (give your perspective on subject)

B. Supporting Sentence (give resolutions; possible outlook on subject)

C. Clincher Sentence (sentence that brings the essay to a close)

***Make sure to use present tense when discussing a literary work

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