1. Is it true that higher education leads to higher pay and/or a better life? Th
1. Is it true that higher education leads to higher pay and/or a better life? Th
1. Is it true that higher education leads to higher pay and/or a better life? This is the argument made by universities (obviously), the Census Bureau, and the Georgetown Center on Education and the Workforce. But some argue otherwise, pointing out that a significant percentage of people with college degrees are earning low wages and that some blue collar jobs can actually pay better. Electricians, for instance, earn an average of $ 56,000 and are in demand. To address this issue, you will need to consult several sources including the Census Bureau, perhaps Social Explorer, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook. You can pick any angle you wish as long as it addresses the main topic and provides a longitudinal look at the data. The instructions are the same as for the second summary, except for these revisions: 1. You must produce at least 3 charts and tables using spreadsheet and graphing programs using reputable and verifiable data sources. If you want to provide further charts and tables copied from reputable data sources, that is fine as along as the sources are completely cited. 2. You must consult at least 2 and preferably more, professional or academic journal articles to help you with your analysis, and/or to form your own argument (thesis) for or against. 3. Your analysis for this third summary should show greater sophistication and attempt informal correlations between the variables you have chosen. In addition to the above, grade points will be deducted if your summary doesn't do the following: 1. Proper formatting of all tables and charts in accordance with Chicago or Turabian manual of style (consult on line), or with the style guide your major follows (MLA, APA, etc.) Tables and charts must include a label, a title, and a complete source citation at the bottom of each. 2. A clearly stated thesis at the beginning (or near the beginning) of the paper). Your thesis should be tied to available data: don't state a thesis that you can't then go on to prove (or disprove) using a data set. 3. Professional or academic data sources. Same thing for your secondary sources used to help you analyze the data. Whenever possible, your information should come directly from the website of the organization that generated the data, or from a professional statistical organization like the OECD or Pew Research. 4. The requirement that you produce your own charts and graphs as stated in Item 1 above. Identify the historical issue or topic. Formulate a research question to address the issue or topic. Locate the primary sources needed to answer the question. Collect and analyze sources. Construct charts and tables to help interpret your data. Offer a cogent interpretation of the data to support your answer(s) to the question. ** The paper does not have to be 8 pages of writing, the pages should have the graphs included as well**

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